Negative PCR certificate no longer required at ports of entry

The Cabinet resolved that it is no longer mandatory for a negative PCR certificate on arrival at ports of entry for both returning residents and visitors, this was announced by the Minister of Information, Publicity and Broadcasting Services, Senator Monica Mutsvangwa during a post Cabinet media briefing last Tuesday.

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Hansen’s Disease

Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease. It is caused by Mycobacterium leprae and it multiplies slowly. Leprosy can also be called Hansen’s disease. This disease is an old age disease and is curable if treated in the early stages, it can prevent disability.

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Obstetric Fistula

Obstetric fistula is a complication of prolonged or obstructed labor. This happens when the child is too big for the pelvis or in the wrong position. The pelvis may not be completely developed, but obstetric fistula can be fixed.

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Zimbabwean Government receives Medical Equipment and Ambulances

The government received various medical equipment and ambulances from different organisations valued at US$2.3 million at a ceremony held at the National Pharmaceutical Company, where Deputy Minister of Health and Child Care, Dr. John Mangwiro was the Guest of Honour.

In his acceptance speech, Dr. Mangwiro said that the donations from the United Kingdom Government were a key component in the treatment of COVID-19.

“This donation from the Government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a key component in the treatment of COVID-19 and will go a long way in the treatment and management of patients diagnosed with the disease,” said Dr. Mangwiro.

Deputy Minister of Health and Child Care also acknowledged the Government of Japan for their unconditional support for the cold chain equipment they have donated valued at US$665 817 which includes 103 ice-lined refrigerators,80 Solar Direct Drive refrigerators, 499 vaccine carriers, and 130 cold boxes (on transit).

“The consignment of refrigerators, cold boxes, and vaccine carriers that we are receiving here today serves exactly this same purpose and supports our goal of reaching all eligible people anywhere in Zimbabwe with potential vaccines for the control of COVID-19,” said the Deputy Minister.

Dr. Mangwiro also recognized the donations from UNFPA as they managed to mobilise US$1.3 million from the Government of Japan which will be mainly focused on the COVID-19 hotspot of Harare and Bulawayo as well as catering for expecting mothers.

“Let me also thank the United Nations Populations Fund (UNFPA) for mobilizing US$1.3 million from the government of Japan to support the strengthening of emergency obstetric and neonatal care (EmONC) in COVID-19 hotspots of Harare and Bulawayo…the donated ambulances will help to strengthen the referral system for pregnant mothers,” said Dr. Mangwiro.

In an effort to reduce maternal and perinatal deaths had risen since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, Japanese Ambassador to Zimbabwe, Mr. Satishi Tanaka handed over ambulances and medical equipment under the project titled "Strengthening Comprehensive Emergency Obstetric and Neonatal Care in COVID-19 Hotspots in Zimbabwe which by Japan and implemented by UNFPA.

"First we are handing over the project titled, “Strengthening Comprehensive Emergency Obstetric and Neonatal Care in COVID-19 Hotspots in Zimbabwe”, funded by Japan and implemented by UNFPA...with the rise in maternal and perinatal deaths seen since the start of this health crisis, this project is expected to improve the provision of maternal healthcare services", Ambassador Tanaka said.

The Japanese Ambassador also handed over the Japan-funded project named “Cold Chain Equipment Support for Smooth Deployment of COVID-19 vaccines”, which was implemented by UNICEF, and is expected to reinforce the country's cold chain system and also ensure that COVID-19 vaccines reach everyone.

"We are also handling over the Japan-funded project named Cold Chain Equipment Support for Smooth Deployment of COVID-19 Vaccines", implemented by UNICEF, this project is expected to reinforce the country's cold chain system and ensure that COVID-19 vaccines reach down to the last person...it includes the provision of cold chain equipment, such as ice-lined and solar-driven refrigerators, as well as vaccine carriers and cold boxes, at provincial and district centers around the country,” said the Japanese Ambassador.

UKaid Development Director Ms. Geraldine O`Callaghan, handing over COVID-19 case management equipment said they were focused on strengthening health system reliance and saving the lives of the most vulnerable citizens of Zimbabwe.

“The consignment that we are here to hand over today contains ventilation equipment. This equipment will help COVID-19 patients experiencing respiratory failure to breath, hopefully preventing COVID-19 related deaths,” said the UKaid Development Director.

The United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA)with support from the Government of Japan which mobilised $1.3 million, anesthetic machines, operating tables, delivery tables, ICU beds, infusion pumps, examination lights, Anti-shock garments, umbilical clamps, Urinary Protein Test Strips, Doppler fetal heart monitor amongst other things.

 

International Childhood Cancer Day

Zimbabwe joins the rest of the world in commemorating the International Cancer Day which was running under the theme, “Better Survival is achievable #through your hands” which calls for well-wishers to help the children that are living with cancer and the frontline workers who are looking after diagnosed cancer children in the world and Zimbabwe in particular.

Deputy Minister of Health and Child Care Dr. John Mangwiro was the Guest of Honour and in his speech, he stated that despite the fact that eighty percent of children diagnosed with cancer can be cured, a large number of children diagnosed with cancer in low and medium-income countries which include Zimbabwe die.

“In contrast to high-income countries where children diagnosed with cancer survive, 8 out of 10 children diagnosed with cancer in low and medium income countries which include Zimbabwe, die,” said Dr. Mangwiro in a speech read on his behalf by the Ministry of Health Director for Non-Communicable Diseases, Dr. Wenceslas Nyamayaro.

The Deputy Minister said that the Government of Zimbabwe has strengthened its initiatives to ensure the survival of children diagnosed with cancer despite the fact that the COVID 19 pandemic has made it difficult to access screening, diagnosis, and treatment services.

“Sadly, the COVID 19 pandemic has made it more difficult for children with cancer to access screening, diagnosis, and treatment services,” said the Deputy Minister of Health.

 

Dr. Mangwiro said the Ministry of Health was keen to take up the World Health Organisation Global Initiative for Childhood Cancer and scale up the provision of Childhood Cancer Services in Zimbabwe with a view to improve the survival rate of children with cancer by 2030.

“The Ministry of Health and Child Care has expressed its interest in taking up the World Health Organisation Global Initiative for Childhood Cancer and scale up provision of Childhood Cancer Services in Zimbabwe with a view to improve the survival rate of children with cancer from the current 20 percent to 60 percent in developing countries by the year 2030,” said Dr. Mangwiro.

KidzCan Zimbabwe Executive Director, Mr. David McKenzie said KidzCan Zimbabwe is now supplying chemotherapy for free at Parirenyatwa Group of Hospitals as well as free transport in order to help the less privileged children that are diagnosed with cancer in Zimbabwe.

 

 “KidzCan is now supplying free Chemotherapy at Parirenyatwa as well as providing free transport to the diagnosed children aiming their goal that is early detection is the best protection”, said Mr. McKenzie.

Dr. Sharon Kapambwe Assistant Director Cancer Control at the Ministry of Health in Zambia said with the aim of the World Health Organisation (WHO) which is 'Towards Care, Cure, and Health for all', avoidable deaths from childhood cancer in low and medium-income countries are a result of lack of diagnosis amongst other things.

"Avoidable deaths from childhood cancer in low and medium income countries are a result of lack of diagnosis, misdiagnosis, or delayed diagnosis, obstacles to accessing care, abandonment, of treatment, death from toxicity, and higher rates of relapse," said Dr. Kapambwe.

To ensure better survival of children diagnosed with cancer, the Ministry of Health and Child Care runs dedicated wards for children suffering from cancer at Parirenyatwa Group of Hospital and Mpilo Hospital in collaboration with Kidzcan Zimbabwe, also provide blood and blood products for free in public hospitals, and training of specialists in oncology, oncology nurses and radio oncologists is conducted at Parirenyatwa Group of Hospitals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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